Events Archive: Fall 1999

Open Q&A session

| 4:00 PM EST | DC1351

By Edsger Dijkstra

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No description available.

Proofs and Programs

| 11:00 AM EST | Siegfried Hall, St Jerome's

By Edsger Dijkstra

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This talk will show the use of programs for the proving of theorems. Its purpose is to show how our experience gained in the derivations of programs might be transferred to the derivation of proofs in general. The examples will go beyond the (traditional) existence theorems.

Dijkstra is known for early graph-theoretical algorithms, the first implementation of ALGOL 60, the first operating system composed of explicitly synchronized processes, the invention of guarded commands and of predicate transformers as a means for defining semantics, and programming methodology in the broadest sense of the word.

His current research interests focus on the formal derivation of proofs and programs, and the streamlining of the mathematical argument in general.

Dijkstra held the Schlumberger Centennial Chair in Computer Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin until retiring in October.

Calculational Mathematics

| 2:30 PM EST | DC1302

By Edgar Dijkstra

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By Edgar Dijkstra

This talk will use partial orders, lattice theory, and, if time permits, the Galois connection as carriers to illustrate the use of calculi in mathematics. We hope to show the brevity of many calculations (in order to fight the superstition that formal proofs are necessarily impractically long), and the strong heuristic guidance that is available for their design.

Dijkstra is known for early graph-theoretical algorithms, the first implementation of ALGOL 60, the first operating system composed of explicitly synchronized processes, the invention of guarded commands and of predicate transformers as a means for defining semantics, and programming methodology in the broadest sense of the word.

His current research interests focus on the formal derivation of proofs and programs, and the streamlining of the mathematical argument in general.

Dijkstra held the Schlumberger Centennial Chair in Computer Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin until retiring in October.

Ctrl-D

| 8:00 PM EST | Golf's Steakhouse

End-of-term dinner

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No abstract available.

Homebrew Processors and Integrated Systems in FPGAs

| 5:30 PM EST | MC2066

By Jan Gray

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by Jan Gray

With the advent of large inexpensive field-programmable gate arrays and tools it is now practical for anyone to design and build custom processors and systems-on-a-chip. Jan will discuss designing with FPGAs, and present the design and implementation of xr16, yet another FPGA-based RISC computer system with integrated peripherals.

Jan is a past CSC pres., B.Math. CS/EEE '87, and wrote compilers, tools, and middleware at Microsoft from 1987-1998. He built the first 32-bit FPGA CPU and system-on-a-chip in 1995.

GDB, Purify Tutorial

| 5:30 PM EDT | DC1304

No description available.

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Debugging can be the most difficult and time consuming part of any program's life-cycle. Far from an exact science, it's more of an art ... and close to some kind of dark magic. Cryptic error messages, lousy error checking, and icky things like implicit casts can make it nearly impossible to know what's going on inside your program.

Several tools are available to help automate your debugging. GDB and Purify are among the most powerful debugging tools available in a UNIX environment. GDB is an interactive debugger, allowing you to `step' through a program, examine function calls, variable contents, stack traces and let you look at the state of a program after it crashes. Purify is a commercial program designed to help find and remove memory leaks from programs written in languages without automatic garbage collection.

This talk will cover how to compile your C and C++ programs for use with GDB and Purify, as well as how to use the available X interfaces. If a purify license is available on undergrad at the time of the talk, we will cover how to use it during runtime.

Living Laboratories: The Future Computing Environments at Georgia Tech

| 3:30 PM EDT | DC1304

By Blair MacIntyre and Elizabeth Mynatt

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by Blair MacIntyre and Elizabeth Mynatt

The Future Computing Environments (FCE) Group at Georgia Tech is a collection of faculty and students that share a desire to understand the partnership between humans and technology that arises as computation and sensing become ubiquitous. With expertise covering the breadth of Computer Science, but focusing on HCI, Computational Perception, and Machine Learning, the individual research agendas of the FCE faculty are grounded in a number of shared "living laboratories" where their research is applied to everyday life in the classroom (Classroom 2000), the home (the Aware Home), the office (Augmented Offices), and on one's person. Professors MacIntyre and Mynatt will discuss a variety of these projects, with an emphasis on the HCI and Computer Science aspects of the FCE work.

In addition to their affiliation with the FCE group, Professors Mynatt and MacIntyre are both members of the Graphics, Visualization and Usability Center (GVU) at Georgia Tech. This interdisciplinary center brings together research in computer science, psychology, industrial engineering, architecture and media design by examining the role of computation in our everyday lives. During the talk, they will touch on some of the research and educational opportunities available at both GVU and the College of Computing.